Hopkins Method Nicot Queens 2007 Nicot Queens 2008 Queen Availability

Ohio Queen Bees
Locally raised queens for local beekeepers


Ohio Homestead Gardens & Apiaries
Lancaster, Ohio
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     “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs.  Ask yourself what makes you come alive, and then go do that.   Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”                                                                                                                                                  --Howard Thurman--

There are certain pursuits which, if not wholly poetic and true, do at least suggest a nobler and finer relation to nature than we know.  The keeping of bees, for instance."                                         -Henry David Thoreau--

 NOTE: Although I am a member of the Ohio State Beekeeping Association, this queen rearing operation is not affiliated with the OSBA's Queen Project and does not produce queens from instrumentally inseminated stock nor are they "Certified Ohio Queens".

Queen Rearing and Bee Links

Eastern Apicultural Society (EAS)

Heartland Apicultural Society (HAS)

Western Apicultural Society (WAS)

Ohio State Beekeepers Assoc.

East Central Ohio Beekeepers

Beeculture

The American Bee Journal

Beesource

Bushfarms

Ohio State Bee Lab

Latshaw Apiaries

Go Beekeeping

Wicwas Press

American Beekeeping Federation

American Honey Producers

Ohio Homestead

---Now SOLD OUT for 2014---

    We are now rearing queens with the intention of providing local beekeepers (and myself!) with queen bees reared in the geographic area and climate type where they will be used. Our current stock includes a lineage of queens surviving here since 2007, inclusion of Latshaw Karnica daughters (open-mated here) in 2012, and now, Buckfast/Carniolan hybrid.  We hope to expand into some Russian stock soon as well. 
     A nationwide effort to implement this strategy, in small, localized cells, will provide beekeepers a healthier bee population without the constant transmission of pests and diseases across the country or the stress inflicted on queens in extended shipping.
    Of course, this will not be easy. In many cases, it will take a change in the mindset of beekeepers. Ohio weather will hamper the typical spring desire for queens and rearing must be done somewhat later in the season, especially if the queens are to be evaluated fairly prior to the sale. This means the development of a program similar to Kirk Webster's in Vermont. Queens reared later can be used to requeen colonies in the summer or for summer nucs raised to be overwintered and then available in the spring.
           
    I use grafting and graftless methods of queen rearing including the Nicot system, the Hopkins or Case Method, and combinations of the Alley and/or Jay Smith method. I like the idea of having minimal disruption in the feeding of the larval state which Jay Smith mentions in "Better Queens" but sometimes need precludes and grafting provides good flexibility.

    Here are pics of some 2009 cells. Some 2008 queens.  Here's some pics of my 2007 attempts at the Hopkins method and some queen cells reared using the Nicot system.

If you are interested in local raw honey, comb honey, creamed honey, or beeswax products, please visit www.ohiohomestead.com. For information on nucs for sale, see OhioNucs. For pollination information utilizing honey bees and alternative pollinators, see OhioPollination. Thanks!

 

Hopkins Method Nicot Queens 2007 Nicot Queens 2008 Queen Availability